Creators' Rights Alliance / Creators' Copyright Coalition

CRA hosted copyleft event takes shape

The most recent newsletter from the Creators' Rights Alliance (CRA Briefings #37) contains an update on the event announced in an earlier briefing.



COPYLEFT EVENT TAKES SHAPE !

The CRA’s Fall event has a name and very soon will have it’s own website. It will take place at Ryerson University’s new Student Campus Centre on September 28, 29 & 30th and it is being sponsored by the School of Journalism. It will open on the Thursday evening and run over Friday and Saturday. We have billed the event as opportunity for artists and creators to share information and experiences about working on/with the Internet. As announced in Briefings #35, it will feature an electronic salon showcasing some of these projects.

A hard must-read for creators

I have been trying to read a paper published by the Creators' Rights Alliance in April of 2005 titled Repositioning Creators' Rights in the Digital World (HTML and PDF versions online). It is co-authored by Susan Crean (co-president of the Creators Rights Alliance) and Virginia Jones (Lawyer with Access Copyright). Ironically I debated Susan Crean as part of the Rabble Rumble back in October 2002, and Virginia Jones at the 2005 Council of Federal Libraries (CFL) Annual Fall Seminar.

I have made reference to this paper in the past in relation to its redefinition of the term "Copyleft" to mean something quite different than those who self-identify with that term.

Copyleft / Copyright / Copywrong – Is Copyright obsolete in the Digital Age?

The most recent newsletter from the Creators' Rights Alliance (CRA Briefings #35) contained an announcement about an exciting future event they are organizing.

The Steering Committee also set in motion plans for the Autumn event Copyleft / Copyright / Copywrong – Is Copyright obsolete in the Digital Age? This will be designed as an opportunity for artists and creators to share information and experiences about distributing their work on the Internet. It will feature an electronic salon highlighting some of these projects. Artists and activists from across Canada and from abroad will be on hand to discuss their work and their experiments with new forms of contracts (such as the Creative Commons licence) and business models. The event will close with an address from the popular Brazilian performer, Gilberto Gil, who is also Brazil’s Minister of Culture. The event will be held at the end of September at Ryerson University in Toronto and is being sponsored by the School of Journalism. Keep you eye on this space for more details!

Independent authors just wanting a little respect... from fellow creators and collective societies

(Also carried by p2pnet. Christopher Moore offered a followup BLOG reply, indicating he edited the article I was replying to.)

Following the meeting with John Degen, and his support for the idea that we have respect for the interests of fellow creators, I want to try to comment on some things said Christopher Moore on the Creators Copyright Coalition BLOG. There are two themes: unhelpful redefinitions of words, and misunderstandings about the objections some people have about collective societies.

The unhelpful redefinition of "copyleft"

The term copyleft has existed for over two decades, and was first defined by the Free Software foundation as follows:

Copyleft is a general method for making a program or other work free, and requiring all modified and extended versions of the program to be free as well.

What is Copyleft, Free Software Foundation

If cyberspace is boundaryless, how can the US government shut down BlackBerry?

On the (incumbent) Creators' Copyright Coalition BLOG, Christopher Moore makes some coments about jurisdiction issues that new communications and transportation technologies have brought to the surface.

Following along the same line of thought, if it is right for BlackBerry to comply with (good? bad? dubious?) American law in the United States, is it wrong for Google to comply with (undoubtedly bad) Chinese law in China?

I submitted the following as a comment. Past comments to this site were rejected, so it will be interesting if this group will be willing to post the comments of a fellow creator's rights activist:

Protecting Creators' Rights in the Digital Age -- letter to the CRA.

The Creators' Rights Alliance sends out a monthly news briefing. In the November issue (#31) there was a report from the conference entitled Copyright Reform in Canada: Meeting the Challenges of the Digital Age held at the Old Mill in Toronto in September 15-16.

I sent the following letter as a reply to that section of their briefing.

Syndicate content