CIPPIC 2006 election questions

During the 2006 federal election CIPPIC had a series of questions for parties. We invite people to ask individual candidates and post any responses.

Mauril Bélanger (Ottawa - Vanier, Liberal Party of Canada)

Dear Mr. McOrmond,

Thank you for your email of January 10, 2006, regarding technology law. I appreciate you enclosing a link to the in-depth survey provided to you by the Liberal party on technology issues. This survey outlines the Liberal party's position on these issues and is your best source of information.

It is worth adding a couple of additional points:

On June 20, 2005, the Ministers of Canadian Heritage and Industry jointly introduced a bill, C-60, to amend the Copyright Act. This Bill did not make it through the legislative process before the opposition forced an early election. The Bill would have made it possible to improve protection for works placed online, and at the same time clarify the responsibilities of internet service providers with respect to the dissemination of works protected by copyright.

Keith Fountain (Ottawa Centre, Conservative Party of Canada)

Mr. McOrmond,

Thank you for your very in depth letter concerning technology law. While I cannot claim to be an expert in this domain, I will do my best to answer the questionairre.

-

1. Copyright Law and Technical Protection Measures
Do you agree that we need legislation to protect Canadians from harmful technologies like the Sony-BMG rootkit DRM?

Answer:

Industries should be forced to label all products which use DRM (or related technologies) in an obvious manner so that consumers are aware what will be install their system if they purchace the product. This would enhance consumer knowledge, which is important. Furthermore, it should not be legal for a content distributer to install software on consumers' hardware without asking for their consent (through an informative dialog).

CIPPIC News Release - Major parties ignore internet issues in election run-up

News Release
Ottawa , ON
January 19, 2006

Major parties ignore internet issues in election run-up

It may be no surprise, but the four main campaigns in the upcoming federal election have largely ignored key internet issues involving individual privacy, free speech, and consumer rights, despite the fact that these issues will no doubt be on the legislative agenda in the coming year.

"We are disappointed", said Philippa Lawson, Executive Director and General Counsel of the Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC), at the University of Ottawa 's Faculty of Law. "While we know that this election was prompted by the sponsorship scandal, and that Canadians are concerned first and foremost with issues such as health care and employment, we expected that all major parties would at least answer our questions. The issues we raised are all ones that Parliament will be addressing this year or next."

Rob Hutchison (Kingston and the Islands, New Democratic Party)

Hi Russell, sorry it took so long to reply. I am enclosing a statement on our position on this issue. I hope it helps. Thanks for your inquiry. Valerie Westgate, Campaign Manager for Rob Hutchison. This time, NDP.

January 19, 2006

Bill Siksay (Burnaby - Douglas, New Democratic Party)

RE: Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic Questionnaire

Attached please find the response of the New Democratic Party to the CIPPIC 2006 Election Survey. It is the policy of our party to respond to surveys on behalf of all New Democratic candidates.

I would also invite you to consult our platform at www.ndp.ca for more information on the issues you raise in your questionnaire.

Thank you for your interest in the views of the New Democratic Party on the critical issues facing Canadians.

I appreciate your efforts to help voters make an informed decision on voting day.

Sincerely,
Bill Siksay, MP
Burnaby-Douglas

George Marshall (Malpeque, New Democratic Party)

Dear Russell McOrmond:

To be honest, our small party in Malpeque has been overwhelmed by the sheer volume of questionnaires and position papers submitted to our candidate, George Marshall. He has been spending time meeting constituents in person, participating in public forums, attending campaign meetings and other events, holding down employment, and writing his own position papers. For this reason (and because both he and I, in our respective positions, are first-timers and had no prior idea of the sheer volume of these requests), I apologise that George is unlikely to be able to respond personally to you - although, of course, I am forwarding your message on to him, and you never know! I know he is interested in IT.

Richard Walsh-Bowers (Kitchener Centre, NDP)

January 15, 2006

RE: Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic Questionnaire

Attached please find the response of the New Democratic Party to your 2006 Election Survey. It is the policy of our party to respond to surveys on behalf of all New Democratic candidates.

Please note that our election platform has yet to be released. We invite you to consult our platform after it is released for more information on the issues you raise in your questionnaire.

Thank you for your interest in the views of the New Democratic Party on the critical issues facing Canadians.

We appreciate your efforts to help voters make an informed decision on voting day.

Syndicate content