Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC)

Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC)

IPPIC, CDT to File First Canadian Spyware Complaint

MEDIA ADVANCE

CIPPIC, CDT to File First Canadian Spyware Complaint

Competition Bureau filing targets Canadian Company

Parallel American Filing before FTC

Ottawa, ON – November 2, 2005 – Tomorrow, CIPPIC, the Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic, together with the Center for Democracy and Technology (CDT), will file complaints with the Canadian Competition Bureau and with the American Federal Trade Commission with respect to the practices of a Canadian technology vendor widely accused of being one of the worst distributors of spyware on the Internet.

The joint filings on both sides of the border will mark the first time the two public interest organizations have co-ordinated in asking law enforcement to address abuses associated with spyware. CIPPIC and the CDT work together in the Anti-Spyware Coalition, a coalition of public interest advocates and anti-spyware software publishers dedicated to building consensus about definitions and best practices in the debate surrounding spyware and other potentially unwanted technologies.

What do file sharing and plagiarism have in common?

This Manitoban Online article by Tessa Vanderhart includes:

But Canadian copyright lawyer Michael Geist has called the conclusions drawn about of Canadian youth by CRIA “laughable.”

“Frankly, I think it’s irrelevant — the data is almost silly,” said Geist. “This has nothing to do with file-sharing; it has to do with being a teenager.”

CRIA’s “Products of the Mind” campaign wrong-headed, says Internet Policy group

CRIA’s “Products of the Mind” campaign wrong-headed, says Internet Policy group

Ottawa, ON – September 29, 2005 – The Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC) reacted with disappointment to the Canadian Recording Industry Association’s (CRIA) characterization of parts of two national polls it released today.

“We welcome CRIA’s attempts to put estimates to file-sharing, but to draw conclusions about the impact of file-sharing on creativity, innovation and economic harm to major-label music companies without even mentioning Canada’s private copying regime just doesn’t tell the full story,” states David Fewer, Staff Counsel for CIPPIC. “Between 2000 and 2004, the music industry collected over $127 million dollars from levies designed to compensate the music industry for private copying of music by Canadians. The industry wants to have its cake and eat it too.”

University of Ottawa Faculty of Law Hosts Techlaw Copyright Summit

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

University of Ottawa Faculty of Law Hosts Techlaw Copyright Summit

Ottawa, ON – September 28, 2005 – The Law & Technology Program at the University of Ottawa’s Faculty of Law will host a Techlaw Copyright Summit on Thursday, September 29, 2005, at Fauteux Hall, 57 Louis Pasteur St., Ottawa.

The one day summit begins at 12:00 noon on Thursday with the launch of the Creative Commons licensed book, In the Public Interest: The Future of Canadian Copyright Law , edited by Professor Michael Geist, and will be followed Friday and Saturday with the Canada-Australia Comparative IP and Cyberlaw Conference, a bilateral conference between Canadian and Australian IP, Privacy and IT legal experts.

Anti-Spyware Coalition Releases “Spyware” Definition

Anti-Spyware Coalition Releases “Spyware” Definition

Ottawa, ON – July 12, 2005 – The Anti-Spyware Coalition (“ASC”), an alliance of technology and consumer groups, today released a uniform definition of “spyware and other potentially unwanted technologies”. The ASC hopes that this definition will prove a useful first step in helping consumers, industry, and law-makers address the problem of spyware. The ASC is now asking the public for help in refining the draft definitions to meet the needs of the entire Internet community.

CIPPIC, the Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic, is the only Canadian member of the ASC.

Digital Security Coalition Concerned over Copyright Bill

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Digital Security Coalition Concerned over Copyright Bill

IT security research and technology decries new liability for circumvention of technological protection measures

Ottawa, ON – June 20, 2005 – The Digital Security Coalition ( http://www.digitalsecurity.ca ), a coalition of Canada’s leading security research businesses, today expressed concern with Bill C-60, the government’s draft copyright legislation. The legislation proposes to introduce a series of new rights to benefit copyright holders, including prohibitions on the circumvention of technological protection measures (TPMs) and on tampering with rights management information (RMI). Rights holders use TPMs and RMI like digital locks to regulate access to and use of digital content.

Media Release - CIPPIC Responds to Government Copyright Bill

(See also: p2pnet: Not a happy day for Canadians

CIPPIC Questions Unbalanced Copyright Bill

Rights-holders get more, longer, stronger rights - again

Users get more liability and, grudgingly, some exceptions

Ottawa, ON – June 20, 2005 – The government of Canada today released its long-awaited Bill to amend the Canadian Copyright Act. Proposed amendments include:

Federal Appeals Court upholds Canadians’ online privacy rights

For Immediate Release

Federal Appeals Court upholds Canadians’ online privacy rights

Court refuses to pierce Canadians’ privacy rights on music industry’s weak evidence

Ottawa, ON – May 19, 2005 – The Federal Court of Appeal today issued a highly-anticipated ruling in BMG Canada v. John Doe, the music industry’s first effort at launching an American-style litigation campaign targeting alleged Canadian file-sharers.

“This is a landmark privacy decision that affects all Canadians,” said Philippa Lawson, CIPPIC’s Executive Director, remarking on the significance of the ruling. "The court has reaffirmed the importance of online privacy and confirmed that those seeking to sue Internet users cannot uncover the anonymity of their targets on the basis of mere allegations. Instead, plaintiffs must provide solid and timely evidence that supports a bona fide claim against the alleged wrongdoer".

BMG et al decision to be released May 19th

ADVANCE: May 18, 2005

Federal Court of Appeal to render decision in file-sharing case:

Canadians' Online Privacy Rights at Stake

Ottawa, ON - May 18, 2005 - The Federal Court of Appeal will render its decision in the case of BMG et al v. John Doe et al on May 19, 2005. This case focuses on whether Internet Service Providers should be required to turn over to the music industry the identities of 29 alleged file-sharers.

The Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC) intervened in the case, assisting the Court of Appeal by presenting public interest arguments on privacy and copyright law that the parties to the motion might not otherwise put forward. Alex Cameron and Howard Knopf argued the case for CIPPIC.

Spam Task Force Report - CIPPIC News Release

NEWS RELEASE: May 17, 2005, Ottawa, ON

SPAM TASK FORCE REPORT GETS POSITIVE RECEPTION

The federal government's Spam Task Force today issued its report and recommendations on what Canada should be doing to stem the tide of unsolicited e-mail, known as "spam".

The Task Force made recommendations for new anti-spam legislation with meaningful penalties, new powers for consumers to sue spammers, more resources to government agencies tasked with fighting spam, industry self-regulation, and greater international cooperation to track down and stop those responsible for the floods of unwanted messages clogging Canadians' e-mail inboxes.

Syndicate content