Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC)

Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC)

Canadian Internet Law Clinic Challenges Sony BMG Settlement

The EFF has reported that CIPPIC has filed an objection to the settlement. The CIPPIC website includes additional documents.

I am always thankful of the hard and critical work that CIPPIC does on behalf of all Canadians, helping to protect our rights online and offline.

See also: Ars Technica

HP probe raises queries about Canadian telcos privacy policies

An ITWorld Canada article by Nestor E. Arellano includes:

probe recently carried out by Hewlett-Packard Co. into its own board members in the U.S. has raised concerns in Canada about how telecommunication service providers protect customers’ private information.
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"The need to protect intellectual property or company information should not trump privacy and human rights," according to David Fewer counsel for the Ottawa-based Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC).

SWIFT probed for leaks

This London Free Press article by David Canton includes:

A complaint has been filed by the Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC) under PIPEDA alleging that the six largest Canadian banks have failed to protect personal customer financial information from inappropriate disclosure by SWIFT. CIPPIC says Canada's big six banks all use SWIFT to process international money transfers. Even though it is SWIFT that is distributing the information, the banks do not escape liability and remain responsible under PIPEDA.

The Death of Privacy

This CIO Insight article by Jeffrey Rothfeder includes:

The Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic, at the University of Ottawa, recently conducted an in-depth study of 64 major online sites, including those of Amazon.com Inc., Citigroup Inc., Staples Inc., Best Buy Co. Inc. and eBay Inc. The study found that, in general, an alarming number of Web-based operations are sloppy, if not downright negligent, when it comes to privacy practices. According to the CIPPIC report, released in April, "While almost all companies we assessed had a privacy policy and were thus aware of the need to respect customer privacy, many failed to fulfill even basic statutory requirements such as providing contact information for their privacy officers, clearly stating what they do with consumers' personal information and responding to access-to-information requests."

A new report about alleged racism and terror on the Internet stirs debate about online freedom

This article by Patrick Lejtenyi in the Montreal Mirror includes:

So says Damien Fox, the coordinator of Electronic Freedom Canada (EFC), a civil liberties group that focuses on the Internet.
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"... But that would just create a persecution complex [among those people] that the Jews are out to get them.”
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Furthermore, says Philippa Lawson, the executive director of the Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic at the University of Ottawa, there already is a process in place to track down authors of hateful or defamatory material online. “A registry is like a no-fly or terror watch list,” she says. “If you start going down that route, it can be very dangerous.”

Privacy Commissioner of Canada awards $388,319 for research on privacy issues

A July 14, 2006 press release from Privacy Commissioner of Canada documents the awarding of $388,319 for research on privacy issues. This includes $50,000 to CIPPIC for "Digital Rights Management Technologies and Consumer Privacy: A Canadian Market Survey and Privacy Impact Assessment. Research use of Digital Rights Management technology in Canada and assess privacy implications."

Toronto Star: Privacy chief eyes U.S. border

A Toronto Star article by Tara Perkins includes:

Philippa Lawson, a lawyer and executive director of the Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic, is asking a court to overturn the Privacy Commissioner Office's finding that it did not have the jurisdiction to investigate a complaint against a U.S.-based website that was selling personal information about Canadians.
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Court documents filed by Lawson say "this case is about the scope of Canadians' legal privacy protection when a commercial organization with a foreign business address reaches into Canada to collect personal information about Canadians and discloses that information to other Canadians."

Bell Sympatico's "monitoring" announcement has privacy advocates worried

This ITWorld Canada article by Nestor E. Arellano includes:

A statement by a major Canadian Internet service provider that it will be monitoring customers' cyber activities for possible reporting to government agencies has sparked concern among privacy advocates.
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"Lawful access is in the books," said Philippa Lawson, executive director of Ottawa-based Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC) referring to a controversial bill covering access to information by enforcement agencies.
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Current lawful access provisions embodied in the Criminal Code, already allow law enforcement agencies to conduct searches and seizure of information through a court order. The proposed update, seeks to allow authorities to obtain specific subscriber data from telecom service providers (TSP) even without a warrant or court order.

Canadian anti-DRM coalition makes timely debut

A newsforge article by Bruce Byfield includes:

We talked to representatives of two coalition members about the status of DRM in Canada: David Fewer, staff counsel at the Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC), Canada's leading legal technology law clinic, and Evan Leibovitch and Russell McOrmond of CLUE, an open source advocacy group.

Study shows widespread violation of privacy laws

NEWS RELEASE: Ottawa, May 1, 2006
(See also: Ottawa Citizen, ITBusiness.ca)

Study shows widespread violation of privacy laws

In a report released today, the Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC) provides the results of the first Canadian survey assessing the compliance of retailers with data protection laws. The results show widespread non-compliance with federal laws requiring openness, accountability, consent, and individual access to personal data.

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