Green Party of Canada

Ken Bell (Chatham-Kent - Essex, Green Party of Canada)

There is a way out

For some time now, there has been an expansion of corporate control into the common good. We know that, corporations maximize profits for their investors, externalize costs and eliminate competition. Competition may be defined as the portion of a recognized market share that is presently not under a particular corporations control. What this means is that when any corporation is allowed to own, even the tiniest portion of a good or service, the remaining portion is seen to be either untapped resource or owned by the competition, whether that competition exists or not.

The privatization of the common good is being achieved through the deregulation of, social services, government institutions and basic natural resources. Governments have been complicit by downloading the costs of services, while implementing increasing standards of high cost inputs. What were once simple acts of kindness or the resources to fulfill basic human needs are now commodities to be bought and sold on an open market. Investors then have a choice of taking from, or adding to, the common good or purchasing portions of it for their own private use. Regulation via taxes or legislation, or through subsidies and venture capital are some of the very few tools that governments have to keep corporate control in check. N.G.O.'s and citizen groups have practiced ethical investment, social marketing, political and economic lobbying and media campaigns to react to crimes against the common good. Sadly with little total effect.

Louis-Philippe Verenka (Papineau, Green Party of Canada)

Hi,

In order:

Do you agree that Copyright should be primarily handled by Industry rather than Heritage, and would you be willing to offer a similar pledge to the above listing Industry rather than Heritage?

No, I believe that copyright issues are too important to be delt with by only one ministry. It should be a coalition of Heritage, Industry, Foreign Affairs and any other ministry that could be possibly involved with such issues. Giving all the power to one department is too much danger.

Would you support a bill to modernize Canadian law to provide legal protection *from* technical measures used to circumvent computer security, circumvent privacy, circumvent competition, as well as other important public policy?

Julie Sabourin (Westmount - Ville-Marie, Green Party of Canada)

Dear Mr. McOrmond:

I recognize that the questions you have raised are very important and must be addressed by the Green Party, as well as the other Partys. Some of your questions are easy to answer, such as agreeing that stronger laws and enforcement mechanisms are needed to protect Canadians from unwanted behaviours associated with spyware. However, some of your other questions will require further reading on my part before I can give a useful answer.

I would be happy to examine your links more in detail and discuss these matters further, once I have more time available after the election.

Otto Casanova (Mississauga - Streetsville, Green Party of Canada)

Dear Russell:

We have very few resources to deal with all e-mails during the elections. Attached is our platform. Our Central Hub may respond, though.

Locally we will remain active. Please contact us then.

Regards,
Otto Casanova
Mississauga--Streetsville

Russ Aegard (Thunder Bay - Rainy River, Green Party)

Hi Mr. McOrmond,

To be perfectly honest, I am really busy with being a teacher and attending debates. When I read your email, there are a lot of issues there and being not as technology savvy as others, I will just defer to our Green Party's response.

Thank you for your inquiry,

Russ Aegard

Neil Adair (Ottawa West--Nepean, Green Party)

Russell McOrmond - Digital Copyright Canada forum wrote:

Do you agree that Copyright should be primarily handled by Industry rather than Heritage, and would you be willing to offer a similar pledge to the above listing Industry rather than Heritage?

Yes

* A recent government bill C-60 proposed legal protection for technical measures that claim to be used to protect copyright. Many of these technical measures are indistinguishable from SpyWare and other malware which circumvents the security of personal computers.

Would you support a bill to modernize Canadian law to provide legal protection *from* technical measures used to circumvent computer security, circumvent privacy, circumvent competition, as well as other important public policy?

David Chernushenko (Ottawa Center, Green Party)

Dear Russell,

Thank you for contacting the Green Party with your concerns about technology law issues. Below are our responses to the CIPPIC questionnaire. The Green Party agrees that no MP who has accepted a financial contribution from a copyright lobby group should then serve as the Minister of Cdn Heritage, or its Parliamentary Secretary, or sit on any legislative committee conducting hearings on copyright matters. We also agree that greater protection is needed against technical measures used to circumvent computer security, circumvent privacy, circumvent competition, and other important public policy.

Raphaël Thierrin (Ottawa - Vanier, Green party)

Thanks for this Russell. I won't have the time to fully understand the issues, but what I've read quickly has opened my mind to a different way of thinking around copy right issues. The metaphor about banks not representing the interest of bank account holders certainly hit the right note.

Best,
Raphaël Thierrin

Trey Capnerhurst (Edmonton East, Green party)

You have the Green party's answer on your site. It is, unfortunately, incomplete in the pdf. form. I'm not sure who's responsible for that, but I believe it should be corrected.

I am more highly competent with software and Internet issues than many, although I am by no means an expert. One can't be on everything, you know... But with the Green party, that is less of an issue than the candidates from the top-down autocracies of other parties. Then it really DOES matter what the individual persons believe. The collective democracy of the movement means that we all get together to solve the problems, then our Parliamentarians work to bring about the changes. It's like the Allthing. For example, when I was in the Edmonton Health study circle, I learned first hand how ordinary citizens can put together the pieces and come up with all the right answers, since they each carry a piece of the puzzle.

Ed Baye (Chilliwack - Fraser Canyon, Green Party of Canada)

Russell McOrmond:

I do not understand enough about the problem in respect to copyright protection for intellectual property. I would certainly need to research this much further in order to respond to your questions. Right now I do not have that time to do the necessary research.

Ed Baye
Green Party of Canada
Chilliwack-Fraser Canyon.

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