SPARC Open Access Newsletter and Discussion Forum

Peter Suber offers a great newsletter and forum for Open Access.

I was forwarded a copy of the Aug 2 issue which included references to movements within the UK and US governments to support (or mandate) Open Access for government funded research. This logic can extend to all forms of research funded by governments, as well as to things such as government created software.

Canada's CIO branch offers position on Open Source Software

A document part of the Federated Architecture Program documents the position on Open Source Software.

Existing Canadian federal legislation, agreements and policies accommodate a wide variety of business models for public sector software acquisition, use, production and distribution. Accordingly, software solutions used in the Government of Canada come under many license types, including certified "open source" or "free/libre" software licenses.

CIPPIC replies: Russell McOrmond (Webmaster for Digital-copyright.ca)

I was not a candidate in the previous election, but I believe it would be useful for people actively involved in technology law issues to offer their own thoughts on the questions for parties and candidates from the Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC).

Supreme Court rules that ISPs don't have to pay music royalties

The court ruled 9-0 that companies providing wide access to the web are merely "intermediaries" who are not bound by federal copyright legislation.

How did past members of important committees do?

I did a quick lookup of the new list of MPs for those races for past members of Heritage Committee and members of Industry Committee.

Past Heritage Minister Honourable Hélène Chalifour Scherrer, Liberal candidate for Louis-Hébert, lost her seat to Roger Clavet of the Bloc Québécois.

ITBusiness.ca: Electoral candidates challenged on IT user rights

6/23/2004 5:00:00 PM - Public interest groups like PIAC asked five federal parties what they plan to do about spam, privacy and open source once in office. Four of them responded. Find out how technology issues stack up on the national agenda

by Fawzia Sheikh

[Read full article | http://www.itbusiness.ca/index.asp?theaction=61&sid=55943]

CIPPIC/PIAC responds to Bulte Report on Copyright Reform

CIPPIC responds to Bulte Report on Copyright Reform:
Together with the Public Interest Advocacy Centre (PIAC), CIPPIC issued a highly critical response
(PDF) to the Interim Report on Copyright Reform released by the House of Commons Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage last month. CIPPIC and PIAC state that the report ignores key evidence and submissions by public interest groups, and lacks reasoning for some key recommendations. They call for rejection of the report and for a more balanced approach to copyright reform in Canada.

Text version follows:

News Release: Public Interest Groups make Internet an Election Issue

News Release

Ottawa, ON

June 21, 2004

Public Interest Groups make Internet an Election Issue

Three public interest groups have launched a campaign to focus the attention of political parties and candidates on issues involving the Internet and user rights. The Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic (CIPPIC), Digital Copyright Canada, and the Public Interest Advocacy Centre (PIAC) have asked party leaders and candidates for their views on user rights under copyright law and other technology-related issues.

CIPPIC and PIAC also issued today a highly critical response to the Interim Report on Copyright Reform released by the House of Commons Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage last month. CIPPIC and PIAC state that the report ignores key evidence and submissions by public interest groups, and lacks reasoning for some key recommendations. They call for rejection of the report and for a more balanced approach to copyright reform in Canada. See http://www.cippic.ca/whats-new .

Toronto Star: Parties the same? Not on tech issues

Surprising answers emerge from surveys

With much at stake, there's little debate

MICHAEL GEIST

LAW BYTES

With the federal election now just one week away, millions of voters are sizing up the national parties' positions on a wide range of issues. For those interested in technology law and policy issues — including copyright, spam, and privacy — the election campaign has been a disappointment as technology policy has barely registered on the election-issue radar.

Read full article in Toronto Star

CIPPIC replies: New Democratic Party

1.Music File-sharing: What is your position on the issue of file-sharing in Canada--should it be illegal?

;:The NDP supports measures that protect the rights of creators, and ensure that their work is valued and compensated, whether it appears on the radio, in print media, on the internet or elsewhere.

;:Any copyright legislation needs to balance the rights of creators, users and distributors. Creators must be fairly compensated for their work, and only a creator can waive that right. At the same time, users need fair access, in order to encourage a vital Canadian culture. We would support legislative measures that involve a careful balancing of all of these factors.

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