Bill Siksay on Copyright Laws

Hansard from Friday, June 13, 2008.

Mr. Bill Siksay (Burnaby—Douglas, NDP):

Mr. Speaker, the Conservatives' new copyright regime is far from being a made in Canada solution. It is a knock-off. It is a bootlegged cheap copy of the American law, a ripoff of DMCA.

The government claims users have the right to copy their CDs onto a digital device, but not if the record company does not want them to. All it takes is one picked digital lock and music lovers are on the hook for $20,000 in fines.

Will the Conservatives admit their made in the U.S.A. law will get Canadian consumers sued?

Mr. Colin Carrie (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry, CPC):

Mr. Speaker, that is just flat wrong. We have a made in Canada approach. The educational exemptions are made in Canada. The format shifting exemptions are made in Canada. The time shifting exemptions are made in Canada. The private copying of music exemption is made in Canada. The Internet service provider liability provisions are made in Canada. The statutory damages provisions are made in Canada.

My friend's comments about the U.S. DMCA are total rubbish.

Mr. Bill Siksay (Burnaby—Douglas, NDP):

Mr. Speaker, the bill does not balance the rights of artists with the rights of consumers. The bill is about satisfying the big corporations. The Conservative copyright regime will, as noted expert Michael Geist says, “...strongly encourage the use of technological locks and lawsuits”.

Is the government really certain it wants to brand this anti-consumer, class action, waiting to happen Copyright Act as a Canadian product?

Mr. Colin Carrie (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry, CPC):

Mr. Speaker, our approach is a balanced approach. We have the comments of the stakeholders on this, and most people are very happy. It is a difficult approach, but we are quite confident that Canadian consumers will be happy with this balanced approach.