Port Moody - Westwood - Port Coquitlam

Riding Information: Port Moody - Westwood - Port Coquitlam

Elections Canada Electoral district profile (Links to Map, Past Candidates, and Past Election Results)


Member of Parliament for Port Moody-Westwood-Port Coquitlam / Port Moody - Westwood - Port Coquitlam (Via Parl.gc.ca)

Name: Hon. James Moore (Via Parl.gc.ca)
e-Mail: <james.moore@parl.gc.ca>
Party: Conservative Party of Canada

Why Heritage Minister James Moore is wrong on Bill C-11 "technological protection measures" (TPMs)

I received a reply from Heritage Minister James Moore dated December 2, 2011. I'm not certain which letter it was in reply to, but it could have been my Who is the Candice Hoeppner for information technology owners? letter I sent to all Conservative MP's back in May/June.

While I am posting the full text of his reply, I wanted to offer a quick response explaining why I think he is wrong on the impacts of the "technological protection measures" aspects of Bill C-11. (See: earlier article for a description of real-world technologies being discussed)

Bill C-11 house debate day 3

On November 14, 2011 we had the third time when the House of Commons debated Bill C-11 (at Second Reading).

The most notable aspect of the debate for me is how the Conservatives are going out of their way to conflate the WIPO Paracopyright provisions (tied to infringing purposes, no restriction on circumvention tools, etc) and the non-WIPO (beyond-WIPO) Paracopyright provisions.

Semi-new cabinet

The new cabinet has been announced (CBC, pm.gc.ca). The key members of cabinet for technology law are as follows:

Christian Paradis (Mégantic--L'Érable), the previous Minister of Natural Resources, is now the Minister of Industry.

Ed Fast (Abbotsford), who was one of the MPs in the C-32 committee, is the Minister of International Trade.

James Moore (Port Moody--Westwood--Port Coquitlam) remains the Minister of Canadian Heritage, and Gary Goodyear (Cambridge) remains the Minister of State (Science and Technology).

New shape of federal parliament and districts I watched closely

Saying this was an interesting election to watch would be an understatement. The Conservatives received the majority they asked for with 167(54.2%) seats, but that wasn’t the biggest story for me last night. The NDP is now the official opposition with 102 seats, the Liberals are down to 34 seats, the Bloc may fade out of existence having barely kept 4 seats, and Green party leader Elizabeth May won her seat. It is clear that change was in the air, and change we received.

Now we will move to the hard part of governing. The Conservatives have some Progressive Conservative types who may be willing to aggressively ensure that Mr. Harper governs close to the center.

The NDP have a large, but very young and new caucus. Their learning curve is going to be massive, and there will be some bumps along the way which they will need to be very careful about.

The Liberals now need to take the time to figure out where they go from here, as will the Bloc who I hope will decide that the days of having a separatist party within the federal parliament are now over.

Districts I will be watching closely on election night

This is turning out to be a more exciting election than it seemed heading into it. While a Conservative majority or minority still seems most likely, who would have guessed that an NDP minority government or NDP official opposition was on the table? Who would have predicted the collapse of the Bloc support in Quebec?

While the mangling of voter intention caused by our antiquated First Past the Post electoral system makes it hard to predict outcomes, I'm pretty confident about some districts. There are a number of specific districts I will be watching closely election night, with most (but not all) based on my interest in technology law.

Past Heritage Minister James Moore steps out of election to work for Apple

According to CTV news and CBC-Radio Canada, past Heritage Minister James Moore has decided to step out of the election race to work for Apple Computer, inc. While it is not unprecedented for past cabinet ministers to leave politics for jobs in the private sector, of even for nominated candidates to step out after the election is called, this is an unusual combination.

Smoke and mirrors from Clement and Moore

Today Ministers Clement and Moore had a little show in Ottawa's Rideau Center where they made statements about the so-called "iPod tax". (See press release)

I find it frustrating that the Ministers claim to be so concerned about a levy on devices, while at the same time including legal support for non-owner locks on our devices in C-32. If I had to choose between non-owner locks or levies, I would choose levies every time. This whole exercise seems to be smoke and mirrors aimed at misdirecting technology owners from the attack on their rights embedded within C-32.

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