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[d@DCC] Two different views on the debate around C-60....

From: Russell McOrmond <russell _-at-_ flora.ca>
To: DECIMA ICT UPDATE <newsdesk (at) decima.com>, General Copyright Discussions <discuss (at) list.digital-copyright.ca>
Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2005 14:17:59 -0400
References: <GEORGIEP6SAH2JZZJfw00000c6b@smtp1.ositechnology.com>

   The politics of Bill C-60 is going to be interesting, with many of 
the groups believing that the public is behind them.

   Take the following opposing viewpoints as an example:

DECIMA ICT UPDATE wrote:
> *Vol. 3, Issue #33*
> *August 22, 2005*
> A Free News Briefing Service on the Canadian ICT Industry
...
> If you've just been sent this 
> newsletter by a colleague, sign up here 
> <http://www.decima.com/publishing/members/ict-tools%2Easp?tool=subscribe>
...

> "I think they’re going to feel emboldened that society is onboard with 
> this, and that the opponents of C-60 belong to a shrill, increasingly 
> marginalized group of academics, activists and teenagers who want their 
> books, music, television, and films for free."
> 
> *Graham Henderson*, president of the Canadian Recording Industry 
> Association (CRIA), confident that Parliament will come down on the side 
> of copyright holders as it weighs Bill C-60, which will overhaul the 
> Copyright Act.


   I returned late last night from Winnipeg.  I spent a week actively 
communicating with a cross-section of people from the Free/Libre and 
Open Source Software community ( plug.ca ) as well as many 
movers-and-shakers in the arts community ( spoken word artists, huge 
numbers of musicians, people from the Winnipeg arts council, etc).

   A quote that I could easily have made about the participants in the 
FreeCultre.ca conference in Winnipeg would be as follows:

"I think they're going to feel emboldened that the informed part of 
society is strongly opposed to this policy, and that the proponents of 
C-60 belong to a shrill, increasingly marginalized group of old-economy 
economic monopolists and special interest lawyers who, unable to compete 
with modern methods of production, distribution and funding, are trying 
to use radical changes to the law to eradicate competition as well as 
the rights of creators and their audiences."

Russell McOrmond, self-employed software developer, consultant and ISP 
focused on open collaborative methods of production, distribution and 
funding of creativity and innovation.  Russell McOrmond was a keynote 
speaker at OpenCity 2005, a festival of participatory culture, 
http://freeculture.ca


   Those who are part of the informed public of creators and audiences 
only need to help educate everyone else, as once people are adequately 
informed about what C-60 is really about they join us in our strong 
opposition to C-60.  We are not people who don't want creators to get 
paid as falsely claimed by the monopolist intermediaries, but are 
largely creators and audiences who are opposed to C-60 *because* we 
believe that creative Canadians should be paid fairly.

   We believe that in order to allow creators to make a fair living that 
they and their audiences should have a legally protected right to "skip 
the intermediaries" who have been expropriating most of the money in the 
past methods of production, distribution and funding of creativity.

-- 
  Russell McOrmond, Internet Consultant: <http://www.flora.ca/>
  2066+ Canadians oppose Bill C-60 which protects antiquated Recording,
  Motion Picture and "software manufacturing" industries from change...
  http://KillBillC60.ca    Sign--> http://digital-copyright.ca/petition/
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