Legislative Committee on Bill C-11

How long will committe be meeting?

As a reminder, the first meeting minutes has the details, with length of witnesses and clause-by-clause set at that meeting.

Mike Lake moved, — That the Committee begin clause-by-clause consideration of the bill no later than Wednesday, March 14, 2012; that debate be limited to a maximum of five (5) minutes per party, per clause, and five (5) minutes per party per amendment; and that if clause-by-clause consideration is not completed by 9:00 a.m. on Thursday, March 29, 2012, the Chair shall interrupt debate and put the question on all remaining clauses and amendments, as well as all other questions necessary to dispose of this stage of the bill forthwith and successively without further debate and shall report the bill back to the House at the earliest opportunity.

The "no later" than next Wednesday may be an earlier date, but I'll write on that as I find out. In any case, we have a maxim of 4 more days of witnesses.

The Effect on the Market Factor in Fair Dealing/Fair Use Law - What IS the law?

I want to point people to a great post by lawyer Howard Knopf discussing an issue that has come up the last few days at committee. There are people who don't like that the Supreme Court of Canada 6-factor test from the CCH case doesn't prioritize the factors and place the effect of the dealing on the market as the primary (or possibly only) factor. Mr. Knopf deals with what the case actually says, and corrects some misinformation given about the situation in the United States.

Delays in summary posting: Super (copyright) Tuesday.

Apologies that my post on todays meeting will be late. After committee this morning I met with Kennedy Stewart (NDP MP from Burnaby—Douglas) to discuss Bill C-11 and petitions, then a regular work day.

I then headed to Carleton University to a meeting with technology students, professors, Liberal MP Hon. Geoff Regan (Halifax West, on the C-11 committee), Liberal Senator Hon. Wilfred P. Moore, CIPPIC staff lawyer Tamir Israel and myself.

Digital Locks have nothing to do with Copyright

I was interviewed by Jesse Brown for TVO Search Engine on Friday, and the MP3 of that interview is now available.

Note: Apologies for the sound quality at my end. I was at my workplace and we ended up using the microphone built into my tablet, which offered better sound than the external mic I use with my phone. Seems I need to buy a better microphone if I plan use VOIP on this tablet in the future.

Bill C-11 legislative committee day 7 thoughts

The seventh meeting of the C-11 special legislative committee was held on March 5, 2012.

Most of the discussion seemed very familiar, with the interactions from MPs matching what I wrote on the weekend as the theme that has emerged from committee. Near the end of the day we heard Mr. Lake going into details of what the bill actually says, suggesting (quite correctly in my mind) that many of the fears that some of the witnesses have about the copyright bill are simply not reflected in the bill.

Theme emerging at the C-11 legislative committee

I have noticed a theme emerging at the C-11 committee.  Copyright law impacts other areas of policy, including cultural policy and with the type of Paracopyright policy in C-11 we see impacts on property, contract, eComerce and other areas of (primarily provincial) law.

While the governing Conservatives have the copyright policy right, they have the non-copyright policy wrong.  The official opposition NDP have the non-copyright policy right, but have the copyright policy wrong.   The lonely Liberal is just doing what he can to get a question or comment in from time to time.

Bill C-11 legislative committee day 6 thoughts

The sixth meeting of the C-11 special legislative committee was held on March 1, 2012.

First group of witnesses was from CHUM radio, bought by Bell to now be Bell Media Radio. They had two simple messages. Between themselves and parent company they are both content creator/copyright holders and ISPs, and they believe the government got the right balance with notice-and-notice.They want this to move forward as, while the big telecommunications companies already follow regime, not everyone does (smaller ISPs, wireless, etc).

Bill C-11 legislative committee day 5 thoughts

The fifth meeting of the C-11 special legislative committee was held on February 29, 2012.

The first witness of the first session gave familiar arguments. While it was the Canadian Independent Music Association, they gave a mini-me performance of what the major labels already presented: The sky was falling, and the blame was entirely from citizens not paying for music. Oh, but lets not target actual infringers, they want to go after the alleged "enablers" of that infringement. Oh, and TPMs were a must and were allegedly necessary for their business.

Russell McOrmond's brief to C-11 legislative committee

I have submitted a brief to the C-11 committee as an update to the submission and being a witness to the C-32 committee. I wanted to submit something focused entirely on the Paracopyright aspects of the bill, include some proposed amendments, and discuss who I believe are the worst when it comes to infringement, inducement and enablement of infringement of IT Property Rights.

The brief is available as a Google Doc and PDF.

Bill C-11 legislative committee day 4 thoughts

The fourth meeting of the C-11 special legislative committee was held on February 28, 2012.

Witnesses: Canadian Federation of Musicians: Bill Skolnik, Chief Executive Officer; Warren J. Sheffer, Legal Counsel. Pineridge Broadcasting: Don Conway, President. Re:Sound Music Licensing Company: Ian MacKay, President; Matthew Fortier, Director, Communications. Association nationale des éditeurs de livres: Aline Côté, President, Les Éditions Berger; Jean Bouchard, Vice-President and General Manager, Groupe Modulo. Canadian School Boards Association: Cynthia Andrew, Policy Analyst, Ontario Public School Boards Association. Association of Canadian Community Colleges: Michèle Clarke, Director, Government Relations and Policy Research, Public Affairs; Claude Brulé, Dean, Algonquin College.

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